Meher Baba copyright 1987 Charlie Mills

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487JOURNEYING1924

Baba was returning to the land of his ancestors and appeared excited about seeing Persia. Memo, Gulmai and other ladies, along with the mandali from Kasba Peth, also came to see them off. To console those who were not going with him, he lovingly embraced each one. Some felt he was taking their very hearts away with him and they wept as he waved goodbye. In the interim, Ghani, Ramjoo, Rustom and Barsoap were to await Baba's return at their homes. As instructed by Baba, Daulatmai and Mehera also returned to their home in Poona. Since Ramjoo would not be accompanying them, Adi began writing diary notes of the trip.

Once they were settled on board the ship, Masaji cooked for the men and prepared one vegetable dish for Baba. Their meals were simple, consisting of a potato dish, bread and tea. Behramji was still not well, and the constant rocking of the ship worsened his condition. Adi, too, suffered from sea-sickness and could not control his vomiting. Baba would nurse Adi and Behramji, urging them to try to eat. It was a difficult journey for them.

When the boat docked at Karachi for a brief period, Pilamai and other devotees were present with flowers and food, and Baba was received with great reverence. Behramji and Adi remained indisposed and continued vomiting.

Later on board the ship, there was a discussion between two sects of Muslims, the Shiites and the Sunnis.  A quarrel resulted and each side began angrily vilifying the other's religious leaders. The irony was that between the opposing groups were two brothers-in-law, one a Shiite and one a Sunni. The Shiite brother-in-law was greatly drawn to Baba and, during the argument, turned to him and asked, "To what religion do you belong, sir?"

Smiling, Baba replied, "To me all religions are one."

After further conversation with the Master, the Shiite man told Baba that if his sect believed in guru-disciple relationships, he would surely have accepted him as his Master. After this, the argument between the brothers-in-law became so heated that they swore they would part company in Baghdad, where they had originally planned to begin their pilgrimage together to Mecca.

The sea was calm as the boat steamed into the Persian Gulf, but a freezing, shiver-inducing cold storm swept over them after leaving the port of Bahrain. By the time they reached the port of Bushire, Baba, who until then had been quite well, also suffered nausea.

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