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4115 1956

Chapter 31: Blood On Indian Soil

After returning from England, America and Australia, Baba resumed his seclusion work in Satara. He stayed at Grafton with the women, but worked at Judge's Bungalow with Kaikobad. The men mandali at Rosewood were under orders not to speak to any woman. One day Baba sent Bhau to the town market to buy brooms, which were usually sold only by women. Bhau looked for but failed to find any brooms being sold by a man. As he was wondering whether to buy some or not, a woman stepped away from her stall or shop leaving her son in charge. Bhau immediately went to him and bought five brooms. He was about to hand over the money when the mother returned. Throwing the money on the ground, Bhau hurried off with the brooms, thus avoiding speaking to the woman. The woman looked at him, shaking her head at his peculiar behavior.

Bhau also had the duty of bringing flour from a nearby mill. One day Aloba complained to Baba that the flour from the mill was not of good quality. Baba told Bhau, "What Aloba says is true. Go to another mill to have the flour ground." Aloba showed him another flour mill two miles away. Bhau had to walk there carrying the heavy sack of wheat on his shoulders.

There was not the least difference between the flour ground in the two mills, and Bhau soon brought this fact to Baba's attention. Baba said, "What? There is as much difference between them as between the earth and the sky! It is my wish that you get the flour ground from this new mill. So why do you insist there is no difference? Why consider the flour? Have regard for my wish."

Another incident during this time in Satara concerned Kaikobad. A former Parsi priest, Kaikobad was a fastidious person. He had to have his meals and tea at a certain time each day, and would not tolerate a delay. He used to have lunch at precisely 11:00 A.M. Once, when he went to the kitchen to eat, the rice needed to cook for another five minutes. But, unwilling to wait, Kaikobad began eating it as it was. Baba was at Rosewood, but he suddenly appeared at Judge's and walked to the kitchen where he found Kaikobad eating. He pressed the rice and found it half-cooked.

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